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LOGCAP-Dyncorp Archive

And What Happens To Them After That?

Posted May 31, 2013 By Ms Sparky

Sudhama Ranganathan – (Indy Bay Media) – May 29, 2013 – Rape is the last thing we want to think about when we consider our military service members.  It just seems like the antitheses of everything they are supposed to stand for, we as a nation are supposed to stand for and what we want others to see when they encounter our military.  We want to project strength, but also the best possible representation of the nation that is known for protecting and helping to promote freedoms, liberties and rights worldwide.  We want people to think of us in the best possible light and as a people that respect others, both for what we have in common and our differences.

Unfortunately, over the past twelve or thirteen years our military, plus our intelligence services and associated publicly contracted private security and private intelligence contractors, have built a reputation for all manner of sex related hijinks and troubles.  They have been known to trade in flesh, as well as to be involved in rape, pedophilia and pederasty.

Contractors, trained during their own US military tenure, have had all manner of problems regarding these things.  One company in particular, DynCorp has in fact proven, through a repeated and consistent pattern of such instances, to have a culture within their organization that tolerates such behavior.

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Contractor Who was Stationed in Afghanistan is Sentenced to 20 Years in Federal Prison for Sending Images of Child Pornography to a Fort Worth Resident

(FBI) – FORT WORTH, TX – Decemmber 21, 2012 – A New Hampshire man stationed in Afghanistan who sent child pornography to a Fort Worth, Texas, resident, whom he met while he attended DynCorp International job training in Fort Worth, was sentenced today by U.S. District Judge John McBryde to 240 months in federal prison and a lifetime of supervised release, announced U.S. Attorney Sarah R. Saldaña of the Northern District of Texas. James M. Markwith, 31, pleaded guilty in September 2012 to an indictment charging one count of transporting and distributing a visual depiction of a minor for importation into the U.S. Markwith has been in federal custody since his arrest in June 2012 in the District of New Hampshire on a related charge filed in the Northern District of Texas.

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DynCorp was paid $73 million for base plagued with issues, contractor says problems started after it completed work

Paul D. Shinkman – (US News) – December 13, 2012 – The government office tasked with monitoring U.S. efforts to rebuild Afghanistan claims the U.S. Army lost tens of millions of dollars supposed to be used to re-construct an Afghan Army base that remains in disrepair.

The Office of the Special Inspector for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) has opened an investigation into the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and its $73 million contract with DynCorp International to build an Afghan National Army base at Camp Pamir in the northern Kunduz Province.

DynCorp was paid in full and released from the contract, SIGAR says, though the base is plagued with structural failures and a crumbling foundation. This investigation stems from an October report outlining the issues.

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Severe soil settling has caused this guardhouse to lean and its surrounding walls to crack. SIGAR has recently identified significant soil stability issues at the construction site of the Kunduz ANA garrison. (SIGAR photo)

Senators see ‘harm to taxpayers’ in government’s decision to pay contractor for inadequate and incomplete work on construction contracts in Afghanistan

(Office of Senator Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) – WASHINGTON – November 20, 2012 -In a bipartisan effort to protect taxpayer dollars, U.S. Senators Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) today sought answers from the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) concerning its decision to approve a $70.8 million dollar settlement with the contractor DynCorp International for faulty construction of an Afghan Army garrison. According to a report by the Special IG for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) that questioned the settlement, some of the structures built by the contractor had completely “failed” and were either “unsafe, uninhabitable, or unusable.”

In a letter to Lieutenant General Thomas Bostick, Commanding General and Chief of Engineers for the Army Corps, McCaskill and Collins address multiple reports of waste and mismanagement associated with the contract, asking General Bostick to provide them with information that would justify the $70.8 million settlement.

“It looks like we paid $70 million for a contract that delivered next to nothing-any reasonable person is going to ask why,” said McCaskill, who chairs the Senate Subcommittee on Contracting Oversight. “Every taxpayer dollar spent in Afghanistan is a dollar that wasn’t spent to build a school or repair a road right here at home, and I think it’s critical that we really scrutinize what we’re getting for the money we’re spending on projects halfway around the world.”

“Many questions are raised by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers decision to let Dyncorp off the hook for poor performance in a settlement agreement made in connection with contracts to construct a garrison for the Afghan National Army,” said Collins, the ranking Republican on the Senate Homeland Security Committee. “The Corps of Engineers has been unable to provide a justification, despite repeated requests from Congress and the Special IG for Afghanistan Reconstruction. The IG audit on the construction of this garrison documented a number of failures. Such failures undermine our national security objective in Afghanistan to train and support the Afghan National Army. This settlement agreement appears to be yet another inexcusable failure of oversight that undermines the overall mission in Afghanistan and wastes taxpayer dollars.”

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We all remember Kosovo. Why is the DoD allowing Dyncorp to bid at all?

Spencer Ackerman – (Danger Room) – November 2, 2012 - Just days after an inspector general report revealed that a giant Pentagon contractor performed “unsatisfactory” work in Afghanistan, the U.S. Air Force awarded the firm another multimillion-dollar pot of cash.

Virginia’s DynCorp, which performs everything from private security to construction for the U.S. military, has re-upped with Air Force to help pilots learn basic flying skills on the T-6A/B Texan II aircraft, a training plane. The deal is only the latest between DynCorp and the Air Force on the Texan II: In June, the Air Force Materiel Command gave the company a deal worth nearly $55 million for training services. The latest one, announced late Thursday, is worth another $72.8 million, and lasts through October 2013.

But the Air Force’s lucrative vote of confidence in DynCorp comes not even a week after the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction blasted the company for performing “unsatisfactory” construction work at an Afghan Army base in Kunduz. The base was “at risk of structural failure” when the watchdogs initially inspected, but the Army Corps of Engineers chose to settle DynCorp’s contract, a move that awarded the company “$70.8 million on the construction contracts and releas[ed] it from any further liabilities and warranty obligation.” (.pdf)

A DynCorp spokeswoman, Ashley Burke, told Bloomberg News that the company disputed the special inspector general’s findings. For its part, the special inspector general took to tweeting photographs of what it called “DynCorp’s failed work at #Afghan #Army Base in #Kunduz.”

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